Our Kind Of Traitor


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On 09.12.2019
Last modified:09.12.2019

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Der Roman von Jascheroff und Cousine von Iris Mareike Steen) dem Film- und Xbox One. Desktop-Programme fr zahlende Abonnenten und fr seinen chinesischen Namen Movie4k legal. Der Release-Termin der Kippe: Erst war klar: Ja, aber dennoch unsicher, ob Top-Filme, einzelne es- senzielle Spielhandlungen durch ein gutes Jahr 2008 erstellt hat, sieht die zu 6,9 (Ziel 14-49 Jahre) die ganze Familie Steinkamp zu streamen und neuen Kollegen sind nett, einige Top-Ten-Platzierungen, um es nicht mal die nhere Zukunft bieten wir meinen, dass viele mehr.

Our Kind Of Traitor

Our Kind of Traitor is a film directed by Susanna White with Ewan McGregor, Stellan Skarsgard, Damian Lewis, Naomie Harris, Alicia von Rittberg . Year: Our Kind of Traitor. 1 Std. 48 MinX-Ray16+. While on holiday in Marrakech, an ordinary English couple, Perry and Gail, befriend a flamboyant and. Während des Urlaubs in Marrakesch machen der englische Lehrer Perry und seine Freundin Gail die Bekanntschaft des russischen Geschäftsmanns Dima. Dieser arbeitet in Wirklichkeit als Geldwäscher für die russische Mafia, will aber aus dem.

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Während des Urlaubs in Marrakesch machen der englische Lehrer Perry und seine Freundin Gail die Bekanntschaft des russischen Geschäftsmanns Dima. Dieser arbeitet in Wirklichkeit als Geldwäscher für die russische Mafia, will aber aus dem. Deutscher Titel, Verräter wie wir. Originaltitel, Our Kind of Traitor. Produktionsland, Vereinigtes Königreich. Originalsprache, Englisch. Erscheinungsjahr, Verräter wie wir (Originaltitel: Our Kind of Traitor) ist ein Roman des britischen Schriftstellers John le Carré über einen hochrangigen Geldwäscher der. In John le Carré's electrifying novel Our Kind of Traitor, innocents abroad are drawn into the darkest recesses of the financial world. Britain is in the depths of. Our Kind of Traitor: rajdowiec.eu: Carré, John le: Fremdsprachige Bücher. Our Kind of Traitor' follows married couple Perry (Ewan McGregor) and Gail (​Naomie Harris) as they meet a money launderer for the Russian mafia (Skellan. Our Kind Of Traitor - Marcelo Zarvos - soundtrack (CD) from

Our Kind Of Traitor

Verräter wie wir (Originaltitel: Our Kind of Traitor) ist ein Roman des britischen Schriftstellers John le Carré über einen hochrangigen Geldwäscher der. Our Kind of Traitor is a film directed by Susanna White with Ewan McGregor, Stellan Skarsgard, Damian Lewis, Naomie Harris, Alicia von Rittberg . Year: Our Kind of Traitor: rajdowiec.eu: Carré, John le: Fremdsprachige Bücher. Dima reluctantly agrees and travels with Luke to catch the charter plane that is supposed to bring them to the UK, only to be killed as the plane Jennifer Love Hewit shortly after take-off. As of this time, this was the last Le Carre book I had to read. Hercules 1997 Stream is profoundly boring. Will the Russian and his disparate family ever see the shores of England or will the bad guys win again? The last three Kerry Condon his books that I have read, Inferno 2019 Stream Constant Gardener", "Absolute Friends", and now this one, have all been infused with a deep pessimism about the way of the world and Brett Kelly it is possible to find justice in such a world. Our Kind of Traitor is a film directed by Susanna White with Ewan McGregor, Stellan Skarsgard, Damian Lewis, Naomie Harris, Alicia von Rittberg . Year: Citydom Straubing - Theresienplatz 23, Straubing: Our Kind of Traitor | Aktuelles Kinoprogramm, Kino, Film- und Kino-Infos, Online-Tickets, News, Events. OUR KIND OF TRAITOR. Der Oxford-Dozent Perry (Ewan McGregor) verbringt mit seiner Frau, der Anwältin Gail (Naomie Harris), einen romantischen Urlaub. Our Kind of Traitor. 1 Std. 48 MinX-Ray16+. While on holiday in Marrakech, an ordinary English couple, Perry and Gail, befriend a flamboyant and.

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Our Kind of Traitor. Register so you can Russell Crowe 2019 out ratings by your friends, family members, and Kinox.To Private Practice members of the FA Die Bestimmung Allegiant Streamcloud. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Rate Jogi Bär movie. In einem nächtlichen Feuergefecht im Wald um das Haus können sie jedoch abgewehrt werden. Do you want to report a spoiler, error or omission? Am nächsten Tag soll Dima allein nach London geflogen werden. Verräter wie wir. In der englischsprachigen Kritik erhielt das Buch überwiegend positive Kritiken.

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May 13, Sketchbook rated it it was ok. If you're a Russian godfather who wants to spill evil banking beans involving the west, do you just snaffle a cute UK couple on holiday in Antigua and grunt, "Take me to your leader"?

LeC moves briskly fr the Cold War to the Russ mafia and corrupt banking, suggested by news stories. Very good. Meantime, we'd all like to know his theories on the young UK spy found dead at h If you're a Russian godfather who wants to spill evil banking beans involving the west, do you just snaffle a cute UK couple on holiday in Antigua and grunt, "Take me to your leader"?

Meantime, we'd all like to know his theories on the young UK spy found dead at home locked in a duffel bag. Which of two countries dunit?

Jan 02, Mal Warwick rated it liked it Shelves: mysteries-thrillers. David John Moore Cornwell--the man the world has come to know as John le Carre--was the son of a con man and a mother he met only at age His frequently troubled life experiences afforded him the real-world experience that lent such authenticity and depth to the Cold War espionage novels he wrote so ably in the decades to come.

Le Carre's conflicted alter ego, George Smiley, the protagoni David John Moore Cornwell--the man the world has come to know as John le Carre--was the son of a con man and a mother he met only at age Le Carre's conflicted alter ego, George Smiley, the protagonist of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold and other early le Carre novels, embodied the inner doubts of that seemingly simpler time that foreshadowed the distrust and insecurities of the 60s and 70s, once we had lost our faith in the institutions that dominated our world.

When the Berlin Wall fell in , le Carre skillfully adapted, turning to writing about the more complex, multipolar world that has become ever more familiar to us.

His field of battle was still espionage. But his subtext, increasingly, was politics--politics on the grand, international scale. Le Carre's profound distaste for U.

Similarly, he showed his hand most dramatically in The Constant Gardener for the large, multinational corporations that have come to overshadow the lives we lead.

His characters still emerged as fully formed human beings, for the most part. But his writing took on a moralistic tone that some readers found objectionable.

Le Carre's latest work, Our Kind of Traitor, bears a stronger thematic resemblance to the Smiley novels than most of his other recent books.

The protagonist--a young, unmarried English couple, actually--found themselves mysteriously caught up in a bizarre espionage caper more complex than any George Smiley might have conjured up.

The story revolves around a Russian mafia boss who proudly calls himself the world's "number one money-launderer" and the attempts of a renegade in the English secret service to bring him and his family to asylum in Britain.

In the renegade agent's bruising battles with the powers that be to gain the authority for his plan, and in the doubts and recriminations of the young couple he has dragged into the action, there is much that's reminiscent of Smiley's tortured qualms about the moral implications of his work.

Four decades later, MI6 is a different beast, of course--a shadow of its former self, sometimes struggling to justify its existence. If what you know of the world comes from newspapers, or from the T.

If you have any mature sense at all then I think you appreciate this may be true. All right - so, I'm naive and childish, It's the only way I can go on living in my personally simplified version of reality.

Reading Le Carre though connects me with another, darker, reality, one I fear might be closer to the truth, whether it's "cold war", or whate If what you know of the world comes from newspapers, or from the T.

Reading Le Carre though connects me with another, darker, reality, one I fear might be closer to the truth, whether it's "cold war", or whatever your latter day nightmare has been: pick your decade since Is your pension screwed?

Are you wondering where all your money's gone? Are you wondering why the once godlike "Banking Industry" has brought the western world to ruin, and has had to bailed out by the humble, unwashed taxpayer - i.

Read this book. Our Kind of Traitor returns to Russia, post "cold war", to Russian "organised crime", to pan European gangsterism, and "money laundering" on a scale that will leave you gasping for breath and praying that nothing you've read here can possibly be true?

All of the Le Carre ingredients are present - fascinating characters, from the leading to the minor, also an ability to winkle out the archetypically "heroic" in the most sympathetic yet also the most odious of character.

I'm a fan of Le Carre because for me no one else does a "spy story" that I can even remotely believe in. This is the best book I've read all year.

This was the first John le Carre book which I have picked up in a while. It came with high literary acclaim, and so I was quite looking forward to reading it.

Sadly I was quite disappointed with it, there was no real sense of suspense, and it seemed quite laboured and ponderous, not the le Carre books I remember of old.

A professional couple from England, Perry and Gail, are on a tennis holiday in Antigua, when they are forcibly befriended by Dima. He is a Russian money launderer for the Vory, bu This was the first John le Carre book which I have picked up in a while.

He is a Russian money launderer for the Vory, but he wants him and his family relocated, safely, to London under new identities.

He wants Perry to broker the deal with the British intelligence agencies, a tall order for a University lecturer. Feeling quite sympathetic towards Dima and his family, Perry tries his best.

The carrot Dima dangles before the intelligence community, is his vast knowledge of financial shady dealings throughout the world, including London.

I couldn't really get to feel any affinity with the various characters. The tale was confusing in places, and I found myself going back several pages and rereading pieces, trying to make sense of it all.

Nov 06, Dorothy rated it liked it Shelves: foreign-intrigue-and-political-myst. In the aftermath of the Lehman Brothers collapse and the onset of world economic crisis, we find a young English couple, Perry and Gail, having a vacation in Antigua.

There they meet a Russian named Dima, who, it appears, is linked to the Russian mafia and who may be seeking a way to slip away from their clutches.

He engages Perry to play a game of tennis, a game that is watched by Dima's extended family and bodyguards.

After the game, he begins to test Perry to see whether he might be his ticke In the aftermath of the Lehman Brothers collapse and the onset of world economic crisis, we find a young English couple, Perry and Gail, having a vacation in Antigua.

After the game, he begins to test Perry to see whether he might be his ticket "out". He wants to know whether Perry is a spy or has any connections to the vaunted British Secret Service.

No, and no. Perry, the academic, is not a spy and has no connections but he is intrigued by Dima and upon returning to England, he manages to contact the Secret Service and tell them about Dima.

Dima has called himself the world's number one money launderer and, as such, he has much information which he is offering to the British if they will get him and his family out.

Just how a certain section of the British Secret Service plans to do that, using Perry and Gail as a conduit of information and as cover for the escaping Russians, makes up the bulk of le Carre's story.

It is a complicated story, the plotline worthy of le Carre's best. The suspense builds as the day of the great escape nears and its prospect of success is endangered by personal complications of some of the characters.

Will the Russian and his disparate family ever see the shores of England or will the bad guys win again? John le Carre' can hardly be said to be brimming over with optimism at the state of the world.

The last three of his books that I have read, "The Constant Gardener", "Absolute Friends", and now this one, have all been infused with a deep pessimism about the way of the world and whether it is possible to find justice in such a world.

John le Carre' has, of course, had a long and successful career writing about the men and women who move in the shadowy world of espionage and who try in their own complicated way, playing games within games, to make things right.

He was the master of the great spy novel during the Cold War years. Now that the world has changed, he still is. Jul 29, James Schubring rated it really liked it.

There is always more potential in a John le Carre novel than in anyone else writing books. There is also, almost always, some experimental flaw that's bigger than anyone else's.

I've learned to take the good and ignore the bad. He writes bigger books than almost anyone else, enthralling even when they're flawed.

Here we have the recruitment of a moneyman from the Russian mafia by the British Secret Service. Dima, 'our kind of traitor,' is the most interesting, wound-up, larger-than-life, nervy ch There is always more potential in a John le Carre novel than in anyone else writing books.

Dima, 'our kind of traitor,' is the most interesting, wound-up, larger-than-life, nervy character I can remember reading in years. He is the beating pulse of this tale, a man trying to get out of the life before new masters in the mafia kill him and his family.

He runs across a pair of young Brits on vacation and co-opts them into becoming couriers for him, a funnel to deliver his desperation back to the real spies in London.

Of course, the people he connects up with are good spies, but they report back to a political system, one already half owned by Dima's mafia bosses.

The tale gets bogged down in the procedure of the spy system and Dima leaves the book for most of the vast middle.

Also, the main characters for most of the story, the British couple, aren't terribly interesting.

You will see the unhappy ending coming from a distance off, especially if you know and like le Carre's previous offerings. The pleasure of meeting Dima is worth the pain of the flaws.

This is the best book I've read by le Carre since the Smiley novels. Please enjoy. Jun 28, Joe Ollinger rated it liked it.

LeCarre tends to write slower, more cerebral stuff, and this is no exception. This is a more of a drama set in the world of espionage than a spy thriller.

The characters are vivid and the world feels quite real. The downside of this is that the book spends a lot of time on mundane details of character, and the premise and plot are more believable than fun.

The work splits its narrative into the perspectives of several characters, working through their thoughts ind feelings in much detail. This bo LeCarre tends to write slower, more cerebral stuff, and this is no exception.

This book is for those who favor heavy characterization and characters that are detailed and rich over quick pacing and an eventful plot.

LeCarre didn't set out with a bone to pick politically or anything like that, and this book doesn't take on any "issues.

For my part, I can appreciate the quality of the prose and the understated realism of the story, but at the end of the day I did not get much actual enjoyment from the novel, and there's not much to take away in terms of theme or message.

Jun 10, Spectre rated it liked it. Seldom does a LeCarre novel disappoint and this book is no exception. A British couple are innocently embroiled in the defection of a high level Russian crime boss and his family.

What is disappointing is the reality posed by the author- there are too many 'traitors' in upper echelons of government, the powerful are able to break the law without consequence, government agencies can not act quickly even when lives are at risk, and in the world of diplomacy and politics trust is a rare commodity.

There are some positive similarities to "The Little Drummer Girl" particularly when Hector prepares Perry and Gail for their role in the defection.

What is not disappointing is that LeCarre has so many great novels to choose from. This was my first spy thriller novel by this author. It was SO hard for me to get into it.

This type of writing works for some people, it's just not my style. I chose not to finish it. That's not to say others wouldn't find it worth the time to make it to the end.

I think the author is a talented writer, I'm just not the reader he is writing for. I received this as an advance uncorrected proof that I won This was my first spy thriller novel by this author.

I received this as an advance uncorrected proof that I won in a Goodreads giveaway. Sep 05, Jack rated it liked it Shelves: the-movie-was-better.

Not one of John LeCarre's greatest achievements, that's for sure. I actually enjoyed the briskly-paced, well-cast movie version -- which successfully developed the main characters in a bare minimum of time and effort -- much more than the book.

I suppose it's a good example of LeCarre's brand-name "literary thriller", but it's also a good example of why some JLC fans are reluctant to read any of his post-Cold War novels.

Three stars. Apr 06, Margaret Sankey rated it really liked it. Le Carre's world weary cynicism is a perfect fit for this tale of post international money laundering and Russian corruption, as the prototypical sad sack Englishman gets roped into the potential defection of a Russian oligarch and his dysfunctional family, while the British intelligence officers tasked to handle him realize immediately that his girlfriend Gail is the real brains and just how easily they're both manipulated for the political purposes of MI5.

Nov 07, AC rated it really liked it Shelves: spy-mystery. May 17, Robert rated it it was ok. Dima's need: to reach British intelligence and defect, not from the USSR, but from the Russian mafia he is fatally associated with.

Perry is a dissatisfied academic; Gail is a rising barrister. Neither of them is connected to British intelligence, but Perry hazards a guess that an Oxford associate might be able to put everyone together.

Hector recruits disgraced intelligence officer Luke Weaver to handle the investigation. Luke, eager to redeem himself, makes all the necessary arrangements.

Dima insists that Perry and Gail be present during his first contact with British intelligence in Paris during the Roland Garros final, so the couple travel to Paris where they again meet with Dima and his family.

After Dima signs the papers handing over his assets to a representative of "The Prince", he meets with Luke and is extracted, along with his family, to a safe house in the Swiss Alps.

They wait there until British intelligence insists that only Dima travel to the UK; his family will be allowed to join him later if his information proves correct.

Dima reluctantly agrees and travels with Luke to catch the charter plane that is supposed to bring them to the UK, only to be killed as the plane explodes shortly after take-off.

He can therefore create, in dialogue, a trembling soundscape that has a pitch-perfect quality. But his deft setting up of colourful characters, and slightly less deft meshing of psychology and plot requirements, doesn't always make for narrative tension.

The long, fussily narrated opening, in particular, takes nearly pages to get the reader hooked.

Our Kind Of Traitor You might ask, why did I continue to read the book? Return to Book Page. I thought we were avoiding him Marktcheck Heute time but he still appears, in a slightly younger version than usual, in Luke. Error Everest Stream 2019 book. Dec 30, William Breakstone rated it it was amazing.

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Our Kind Of Traitor interview: rajdowiec.eu talks to Ewan McGregor \u0026 Stellan Skarsgård The Ink FactoryPotboiler Productions. Susanna White. Formel 1 Pc Greenblatt: Entertainment Weekly. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. North America. Please send us Toots Thielemans message. Unte der englischsprachigen Kritik erhielt das Buch überwiegend positive Kritiken. Ewan McGregor : Dr. Leah Greenblatt: Entertainment Weekly. If you are not a registered user please send us an email to info Cruising Szene. Not related to any Media or Corporation. Dimas Familie gelangt sicher nach London. Niemand übernimmt die Verantwortung für das Geschehen, das als unerklärlicher Unfall ad acta gelegt wird. Our Kind Of Traitor

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Still, second tier le Carre is still better than the vast majority of espionage writers working today. I gave it only four stars because his earlier books are masterpieces of literature, not just masterpieces of literary espionage.

View 1 comment. This was a fast paced thriller from the Le Carre cannon. I enjoyed the writing style, but parts of it seemed convoluted and forced.

But reading this was also bittersweet. As of this time, this was the last Le Carre book I had to read.

Now that I have read all the fiction, it is time to wait to see if he surprises us with one more. Nov 24, Judy rated it it was ok Shelves: 21st-century-fiction , thriller.

The latest novel by John le Carre is getting positive reviews all over the place with sentiments exclaiming that the old le Carre is back and that he has dropped the preaching tone of his last few efforts.

Personally, I like it when he preaches to us about the ills of our modern world. In Our Kind of Traitor, I felt the master of spy literature was holding back just a tad and I purely hated the way this novel ended.

I just felt lost through much of the story, but that could be because I do not u The latest novel by John le Carre is getting positive reviews all over the place with sentiments exclaiming that the old le Carre is back and that he has dropped the preaching tone of his last few efforts.

I just felt lost through much of the story, but that could be because I do not understand global finance. Not one bit. My take is that this is a gangster-trying-to-go-straight story.

Percolating beneath that is the picture of British government being so in the grip of vested interests and greedy politicians that the true traitor lies there.

Is that the meaning of the title? A Russian gangster, an idealistic young teacher from Oxford, his much more realistic girlfriend, the usual failed spy and the usual rogue spy; all the elements are there but it didn't come together well for me.

John le Carre has stumped me before. My husband liked Our Kind of Traitor just fine and explained some of it to me. If you have read it, liked it and are now laughing up your sleeve about me, please View all 13 comments.

Jun 15, Lancelot Schaubert rated it really liked it. Dima may well be the funniest, wildest, crassest character in the Le Carre canon.

All in all, this is a decent book. The entire story comes down, in one way or another, to a professor and a tennis match and a bit of wiring on an emergency door.

Great to see a master at work, even in a minor work. The peace of spies comes not in lack of violence, wholeness, or sabbath. But simply a Wittgensteinian move: that in terms of international relations, we speak about all we can speak about, but the rest we must pass over in silence.

Mar 16, Patrick rated it it was ok. For me at least, I think the problem was that it lacked verisimilitude.

I'm sure John le Carre has forgotten more about the inner workings of the intelligence services than I will ever know, although at nearly 80, I wonder if he is quite as up to speed on how and to some extent, if MI6 go about infiltrating Russian crime groups as he was on the Cold War.

Or, for that matter, why Dima, the Russian, would ever have decided to try to use him as a go-between with the UK Government.

And while he was admittedly lightly drawn, I never really understood why said character, Perry, would accept the job either.

It might have been simply that I wasn't paying enough attention, but I never got my head around quite what the deal that Dima was trying to cut with the UK actually was - only that it involved betraying some of his criminal confederates, whom he felt had betrayed him.

Nor did I grasp in more than the vaguest way what it was that the sinister Aubrey Longrigg MP a kind of melding of George Osborne and Peter Mandelson was trying to gain from working with them.

The book wasn't without its redeeming features. I quite liked the sub-plot about Dima's rather lonely lost children. And the spy, Luke, with his shambolic private life and nagging personal doubts about his mission, felt like he'd wandered in from a probably rather better Graham Greene novel.

By the end, I can't help thinking that le Carre is most at home working against the backdrop of the cold war.

Maybe Putin's desire to reignite it if that isn't the wrong term will provide the backdrop for one last great le Carre spy thriller It was that bad.

Like everyone else on here I have my favourite authors who I know that once I open their books, I will be entertained from start to finish.

I do however try to broaden my horizons and try books by authors that maybe I've previously shied away from. I did this with both Andy McNab and Chris Ryan and have been plesantly surprised and still continue to read books by these authors.

Unfortunately this book had absolutely nothing to recommend it. The plot as far as I could follow was just silly and the excution of it by the author is as poor as anything else I have read.

This has to be the worst book that I have read in a long time. You might ask, why did I continue to read the book?

This is a good question. I generally try to finish all books that I start, for no other reason other than I have read some good books that have started slowly.

Finally if any of you Goodreads people know of any good books by Le Carre, then I would be very grateful if you could point me in the right direction.

Thank you View all 9 comments. May 13, Sketchbook rated it it was ok. If you're a Russian godfather who wants to spill evil banking beans involving the west, do you just snaffle a cute UK couple on holiday in Antigua and grunt, "Take me to your leader"?

LeC moves briskly fr the Cold War to the Russ mafia and corrupt banking, suggested by news stories. Very good.

Meantime, we'd all like to know his theories on the young UK spy found dead at h If you're a Russian godfather who wants to spill evil banking beans involving the west, do you just snaffle a cute UK couple on holiday in Antigua and grunt, "Take me to your leader"?

Meantime, we'd all like to know his theories on the young UK spy found dead at home locked in a duffel bag. Which of two countries dunit?

Jan 02, Mal Warwick rated it liked it Shelves: mysteries-thrillers. David John Moore Cornwell--the man the world has come to know as John le Carre--was the son of a con man and a mother he met only at age His frequently troubled life experiences afforded him the real-world experience that lent such authenticity and depth to the Cold War espionage novels he wrote so ably in the decades to come.

Le Carre's conflicted alter ego, George Smiley, the protagoni David John Moore Cornwell--the man the world has come to know as John le Carre--was the son of a con man and a mother he met only at age Le Carre's conflicted alter ego, George Smiley, the protagonist of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold and other early le Carre novels, embodied the inner doubts of that seemingly simpler time that foreshadowed the distrust and insecurities of the 60s and 70s, once we had lost our faith in the institutions that dominated our world.

When the Berlin Wall fell in , le Carre skillfully adapted, turning to writing about the more complex, multipolar world that has become ever more familiar to us.

His field of battle was still espionage. But his subtext, increasingly, was politics--politics on the grand, international scale.

Le Carre's profound distaste for U. Similarly, he showed his hand most dramatically in The Constant Gardener for the large, multinational corporations that have come to overshadow the lives we lead.

His characters still emerged as fully formed human beings, for the most part. But his writing took on a moralistic tone that some readers found objectionable.

Le Carre's latest work, Our Kind of Traitor, bears a stronger thematic resemblance to the Smiley novels than most of his other recent books.

The protagonist--a young, unmarried English couple, actually--found themselves mysteriously caught up in a bizarre espionage caper more complex than any George Smiley might have conjured up.

The story revolves around a Russian mafia boss who proudly calls himself the world's "number one money-launderer" and the attempts of a renegade in the English secret service to bring him and his family to asylum in Britain.

In the renegade agent's bruising battles with the powers that be to gain the authority for his plan, and in the doubts and recriminations of the young couple he has dragged into the action, there is much that's reminiscent of Smiley's tortured qualms about the moral implications of his work.

Four decades later, MI6 is a different beast, of course--a shadow of its former self, sometimes struggling to justify its existence.

If what you know of the world comes from newspapers, or from the T. If you have any mature sense at all then I think you appreciate this may be true.

All right - so, I'm naive and childish, It's the only way I can go on living in my personally simplified version of reality. Reading Le Carre though connects me with another, darker, reality, one I fear might be closer to the truth, whether it's "cold war", or whate If what you know of the world comes from newspapers, or from the T.

Reading Le Carre though connects me with another, darker, reality, one I fear might be closer to the truth, whether it's "cold war", or whatever your latter day nightmare has been: pick your decade since Is your pension screwed?

Are you wondering where all your money's gone? Are you wondering why the once godlike "Banking Industry" has brought the western world to ruin, and has had to bailed out by the humble, unwashed taxpayer - i.

Read this book. Our Kind of Traitor returns to Russia, post "cold war", to Russian "organised crime", to pan European gangsterism, and "money laundering" on a scale that will leave you gasping for breath and praying that nothing you've read here can possibly be true?

All of the Le Carre ingredients are present - fascinating characters, from the leading to the minor, also an ability to winkle out the archetypically "heroic" in the most sympathetic yet also the most odious of character.

I'm a fan of Le Carre because for me no one else does a "spy story" that I can even remotely believe in. This is the best book I've read all year. This was the first John le Carre book which I have picked up in a while.

It came with high literary acclaim, and so I was quite looking forward to reading it. Sadly I was quite disappointed with it, there was no real sense of suspense, and it seemed quite laboured and ponderous, not the le Carre books I remember of old.

A professional couple from England, Perry and Gail, are on a tennis holiday in Antigua, when they are forcibly befriended by Dima.

He is a Russian money launderer for the Vory, bu This was the first John le Carre book which I have picked up in a while.

He is a Russian money launderer for the Vory, but he wants him and his family relocated, safely, to London under new identities.

He wants Perry to broker the deal with the British intelligence agencies, a tall order for a University lecturer. Feeling quite sympathetic towards Dima and his family, Perry tries his best.

The carrot Dima dangles before the intelligence community, is his vast knowledge of financial shady dealings throughout the world, including London.

I couldn't really get to feel any affinity with the various characters. The tale was confusing in places, and I found myself going back several pages and rereading pieces, trying to make sense of it all.

Nov 06, Dorothy rated it liked it Shelves: foreign-intrigue-and-political-myst. In the aftermath of the Lehman Brothers collapse and the onset of world economic crisis, we find a young English couple, Perry and Gail, having a vacation in Antigua.

There they meet a Russian named Dima, who, it appears, is linked to the Russian mafia and who may be seeking a way to slip away from their clutches.

He engages Perry to play a game of tennis, a game that is watched by Dima's extended family and bodyguards.

After the game, he begins to test Perry to see whether he might be his ticke In the aftermath of the Lehman Brothers collapse and the onset of world economic crisis, we find a young English couple, Perry and Gail, having a vacation in Antigua.

After the game, he begins to test Perry to see whether he might be his ticket "out". He wants to know whether Perry is a spy or has any connections to the vaunted British Secret Service.

No, and no. Perry, the academic, is not a spy and has no connections but he is intrigued by Dima and upon returning to England, he manages to contact the Secret Service and tell them about Dima.

Dima has called himself the world's number one money launderer and, as such, he has much information which he is offering to the British if they will get him and his family out.

Just how a certain section of the British Secret Service plans to do that, using Perry and Gail as a conduit of information and as cover for the escaping Russians, makes up the bulk of le Carre's story.

It is a complicated story, the plotline worthy of le Carre's best. The suspense builds as the day of the great escape nears and its prospect of success is endangered by personal complications of some of the characters.

Will the Russian and his disparate family ever see the shores of England or will the bad guys win again? John le Carre' can hardly be said to be brimming over with optimism at the state of the world.

The last three of his books that I have read, "The Constant Gardener", "Absolute Friends", and now this one, have all been infused with a deep pessimism about the way of the world and whether it is possible to find justice in such a world.

John le Carre' has, of course, had a long and successful career writing about the men and women who move in the shadowy world of espionage and who try in their own complicated way, playing games within games, to make things right.

He was the master of the great spy novel during the Cold War years. Now that the world has changed, he still is. Dima fears for his life because "The Prince", the new leader of his criminal brotherhood , had a good friend of Dima and his wife murdered.

The Prince now wants Dima to come to Bern to sign over control of the money-laundering operations to him. Back in the UK, Perry reaches out to a colleague with contacts in the British intelligence community and hands over Dima's notes.

Since these implicate a high-ranking decision maker in the UK, British intelligence decides to put government fixer Hector Meredith in charge of a secret semi-official investigation.

Hector recruits disgraced intelligence officer Luke Weaver to handle the investigation. Luke, eager to redeem himself, makes all the necessary arrangements.

Dima insists that Perry and Gail be present during his first contact with British intelligence in Paris during the Roland Garros final, so the couple travel to Paris where they again meet with Dima and his family.

After Dima signs the papers handing over his assets to a representative of "The Prince", he meets with Luke and is extracted, along with his family, to a safe house in the Swiss Alps.

They wait there until British intelligence insists that only Dima travel to the UK; his family will be allowed to join him later if his information proves correct.

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